We bring you the latest news from the healthcare about the health care in the United Kingdom. Do your have news for us? Contact the editor. Watch also this special movie.

vrijdag 6 oktober 2017

RCGP: Letters to The Times and The Telegraph on unfair CQC reporting

Letters to The Times and The Telegraph on unfair CQC reporting

The Times

Sir,

It is extremely disappointing to see The Times engage in scaremongering patients to leave unsafe GP surgeries when the facts prove otherwise ("7m patients are urged to leave unsafe GP surgeries, Sep 21).

The article completely buries the key finding of the Care Quality Commission's (CQC) report which showed 90 per cent of GP practices in England have been rated as outstanding or good. Furthermore, it ignores that the profession was named as the highest performing sector regulated by the CQC.

This is yet another slap in the face for hard working, dedicated GPs and our teams who are working tirelessly to deliver care to over 1m patients a day against a backdrop of intense resource and workforce pressures. On seeing these headlines, GPs will have felt disheartened and demoralised, and patients will have been terrified.

Workload in general practice has increased 16% over the last seven years – but we have had nearly a decade of under-investment in our service. GPs should be supported for our fantastic work, not vilified.

Professor Helen Stokes-Lampard
Chair, Royal College of General Practitioners


The Telegraph

Sir,

It beggars belief that the Daily Telegraph could twist a positive report which found that 90 per cent of GP practices in England have been rated as outstanding or good by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) into such a negative story ('Small GP practices pose worst risk to patients' health, says watchdog', p1 ; 'GP Failings', editorial).

The figures cited refer to initial inspections of GP practices - the majority of which have since improved. Furthermore, the profession was named as the highest performing sector regulated by the CQC.

The claims are yet another slap in the face for hard working, dedicated GPs and our teams who are working tirelessly to deliver care to over 1m patients a day against a backdrop of intense resource and workforce pressures. On seeing these headlines, GPs will have felt disheartened and demoralised, and patients will have been terrified.

Workload in general practice has increased 16% over the last seven years – but we have had nearly a decade of under-investment in our service. GPs should be supported for our fantastic work, not vilified.

Professor Helen Stokes-Lampard
Chair, Royal College of General Practitioners

Read more

Leading GP says budget is missed opportunity for patient care

The budget, announced on Sunday, includes a deal which will provide £210m in extra funding for a range of services over the next two years. 

Responding to the budget, RCGP Wales Chair, Dr Rebecca Payne, said: "This budget is a missed opportunity. I am deeply disappointed that the Government have not grasped the opportunity to improve patient care by investing in general practice.

"The Government know that health and social care services have to change to meet the needs of our population. This means that care will move away from hospitals and will instead be delivered within the community, closer to people's homes.

"This is the right approach to take but it will not be possible without substantial investment to strengthen general practice to ensure that all patients receive high quality, timely care.

"We need the Welsh Government to back up words with action and invest 11% of the NHS budget in general practice.

"General practice is facing a workforce crisis. In 2016, almost one quarter of GPs (22.2%)  were aged 55 or over, meaning that they are likely to retire within the next decade. This will have massive consequences for patient care as many will find that they need to wait longer to see their family doctor. When we combine this with the aging population living with more complex health needs the spending plans simply don't address the challenge this brings.

"To help solve the GP workforce crisis, we need to expand the GP workforce by 485 GPs by 2021. Last year, we outlined steps to be taken to deliver this, including boosting the numbers of GP training places to 200 a year and doing more to encourage GPs to stay in the profession for longer.

"GPs up and down the country are getting increasingly frustrated by the lack of concrete progress or commitments from Welsh Government. RCGP Wales hopes that the Welsh Government will listen to our concerns and make sure that for the sake of patients, general practice is not forgotten."

Read more

Anxiety and depression serious mental health conditions for patients of all ages says RCGP

She said: "Older people are potentially vulnerable and we have to be careful that we don't normalise depression and anxiety as a routine part of ageing.

"Mental health is a priority for GPs and we work with people with a wide range of mental health problems. However, many older people still feel there is a stigma attached to talking about depression and we need to persuade more people that opening up and talking about their mental health issues is not a sign of weakness.

"Anxiety and depression are potentially serious mental health conditions for people of all ages and must be treated as such.

"GPs are expert medical generalists and are highly trained to deal with patients of all ages with mental health conditions, and prescribe accordingly and appropriately.

"It is essential that we strive to give mental health the same parity of esteem that physical health problems have – in the NHS and throughout society - and in doing so reduce some of the unfortunate, and unwarranted, stigma that some patients face.

"We strongly welcome the new guidelines by NHS England, 'Mental Health in Older People', and we support Age UK's campaign to highlight the importance of mental health issues for older people."

 

Read more