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donderdag 15 juni 2017

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OSHA's New Reporting Rule

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Identify, Verify, and Comply:  The Three Pillars Of A Successful Electrical Safety Program
May 31, 2017
Courtesy OH&S

In today's day and age, power is not only a convenience, but a physiological need. People need power to function-we depend on it, businesses depend on it, and industry depends on it. The demand for electricity has been significantly high as a result of various factors such as economic growth, technological advancements, and increase in population over the past few decades. And while the need for reliable power delivery only continues to grow, so does the size of electrical market, as well as the pool of workers on or near energized equipment, thereby increasing the size of the electrical safety market. 

The global expansion of energy transmission and distribution network, the trend of industrial automation, and industrial safety regulations are the primary factors contributing to the growth of this market. Moreover, the danger of workplace exposure to electrical hazards continues to increase as workers' responsibilities expand to include interaction with electrical equipment. In reality, almost every single facility has a need for electrical safety as maintenance workers, janitorial staff, facilities staff, and equipment operators all risk exposure to electrical shock. There is quite a large number of possible end users. As such, awareness is paramount-not only about the requirements for use, but also about the requirements for in-service inspection and testing of rubber insulating equipment.

Identifying the Need for Electrical Safety

Arc flash and electrical shock injuries continue to pose a significant threat to workplace health and safety. Anywhere from five to 10 arc explosions occur in electric equipment every day in the United States, and as many as 10 United States workers are killed or injured according to CapSchell Inc., a Chicago-based research and consulting firm. Moreover, the risks associated with shock and electrocution from inadvertent contact with energized parts have also long been recognized as a danger to workers, and they aren't going away any time soon, if ever. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), electrocution is the fifth-leading cause of workplace fatalities in the United States, with more than 2,000 fatal and more than 24,000 non-fatal electrical injuries reported in the past 10 years. Because BLS counts arc flashes as burns rather than in its electrical shock statistics, the true rate of electrical shocks is even higher. Furthermore, OSHA estimates that 80 percent of electrically related accidents and fatalities involving "Qualified Workers" are caused by arc flash/arc blast.
 
OSHA rules and the NFPA 70E standard make the use of rubber insulting products mandatory when even the smallest probability of contact with 50 volts AC or higher exists. Regardless of the heavy fines, serious injuries, and deaths that occur from arc flash and electrical incidents, compliance continues to remain an issue. What's even more shocking is that many workers are not using rubber insulating equipment because they simply don't know they need it.
While the best way to prevent arc or electrical incidents from happening is to de-energize equipment before beginning work, there are instances where turning off the power could create an even greater hazard. As such, employers and facility owners must establish safe practices to protect their workers against arc flash incidents, including the use of personal protective equipment (PPE).
 
 
 
May 31, 2017 - 226K In OSHA Fines For Cable Manufacturer After Fatal Incident
May 31, 2017
Milton, FL

The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has issued a dozen citations and proposed $226,431 in fines following its investigation into the Nov. 29, 2016, death of a 26-year-old machine operator at a Pensacola-area electrical cable manufacturer.

Milton-based Gulf Cable LLC was cited for failing to take measures to protect Jonathan Gilmore, who was pulled into a re-spool machine and crushed as he attempted to guide electrical wiring cable into the machine.  OSHA found the machine lacked the required guarding to prevent him from coming into contact with its moving parts.

"Jonathan Gilmore's death could have been prevented," said Brian Sturtecky, O­­SHA's area director in Jacksonville. "Employers have a responsibility to provide safe work environments for their workers regardless of production schedules. When employers fail to use equipment properly and safely, they put employees at risk of serious injury or worse."

OSHA issued 12 violations to Gulf Cable for one willful, one repeat, seven serious and three other-than-serious safety violations. The willful citation relates to the company's failure to install guards to prevent machine operators from coming into contact with the cable as it winds onto the spool.

The agency also cited the employer for one repeat violation for failing to develop, document and utilize hazardous energy control procedures to prevent machines from operating while employees performed service and maintenance.

OSHA issued serious citations to Gulf Cable for failing to:
  • Install guardrails on all four sides of machinery in the pit area, exposing workers to trip and fall hazards.
  • Repair or replace cut electrical wiring for the emergency-stop foot pedal, exposing workers to electrical shock and electrocution hazards.
 
Proposed penalties:  $226,431
 
 
 
Do You Have A Written Electrical Safety Program?
 
 
College Owner Fined $15Gs In Worker's Death
Performing Unlicensed Electrical Work
June 1, 2017
Courtesy of Toronto Sun
 
An Ontario court has fined a business owner $15,000 for hiring an unlicensed contractor who was killed doing electrical work.

Ontario's Electrical Safety Authority says Elias Mikhail was electrocuted in October 2013 at a career college in Mississauga.

The owner, Jamal Shihadeh, was paying Mikhail cash and had no permits for the electrical work.

An investigation found that Mikhail was jolted by wiring carrying 347 volts and died.

Shihadeh found his body a day later
 
 
Scott Saint, with the safety authority, says the conviction underlines the dangers of improperly done and unlicensed electrical work.

"Two people have paid the price - one with his life and the other with this conviction and the knowledge of this incident for the rest of his life," Saint said in a statement. "This is an important reminder that business owners and operators must understand legal requirements when hiring people to do electrical work."

Ontario law makes it an offence for a business to do electrical work without a licence. Licensed contractors are obliged to follow a series of safety rules.

In addition to the fine, the court ordered Shihadeh to pay another $3,750 as a victim surcharge.
 


   
 
Proper PPE
Correct Way to Wear Head Protection
 

 
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Facility Results has launched a new website dedicated to providing full documentation, tutorials and knowledge base for FlashTrack.   

This website is designed for the user to "meet" FlashTrack. 
To Learn More Go To
FlashTrack Earns Recognition As Top Product For The Third Consecutive Year

 FlashTrack™ Arc Flash Data Collection Software


FlashTrack's™ simple, drag-n-drop interface is one of its biggest selling points. Couple that with the tool's intuitive, drop-down menus, convenient component libraries, and keyboard shortcuts, and you'll be up and running with FlashTrack in minutes!
 
FlashTrack™ is an award winning data collection software tool. FlashTrack™ was developed for the purpose of collecting the required equipment attributes that are needed to conduct an arc flash analysis. These same attributes can be used to complete a coordination study or short circuit analysis. FlashTrack™ allows the qualified data collector to model equipment relationships using a drag-n-drop interface. FlashTrack™ is used to catalog the attributes in the format of a single-line diagram. FlashTrack™ exports the completed files to an Excel file (.xls) or CSV file and produces a "Label Installation Report" containing the location of each item that requires a label to be installed. This report can have up to 4 photographs per item for easier item location. The label installation report will save you time and money and eliminate frustration when locating each piece of equipment.

 

What OSHA Says About Protecting Workers From Electrical Flames and Arc Hazards

What OSHA says about protecting workers from Electrical Flames and Electrical Arc Hazards:
  • The employer must assess the workplace to identify workers exposed to flame or electric-arc-hazard.
  • No later than January 1, 2015, employers must estate the incident heat energy of electric-arc hazard to which a worker would be exposed.
  • No later than April 1, 2015, employers generally must provide workers exposed to hazards from electric-arc with protective clothing and other protective equipment with an arc rating greater than or equal to the estimated heat energy.

Facility Results has several programs that can be implemented in as little as one week for most average size facilities.  
Call us today so we can help you become compliant

 

Free Download

FlashTrack™ Arc Flash Data Collection Software



FlashTrack's™ simple, drag-n-drop interface is one of its biggest selling points. Couple that with the tool's intuitive, drop-down menus, convenient component libraries, and keyboard shortcuts, and you'll be up and running with FlashTrack in minutes!

FlashTrack™ is an award winning data collection software tool. FlashTrack™ was developed for the purpose of collecting the required equipment attributes that are needed to conduct an arc flash analysis. These same attributes can be used to complete a coordination study or short circuit analysis. FlashTrack™ allows the qualified data collector to model equipment relationships using a drag-n-drop interface. FlashTrack™ is used to catalog the attributes in the format of a single-line diagram. FlashTrack™ exports the completed files to an Excel file (.xls) or CSV file and produces a "Label Installation Report" containing the location of each item that requires a label to be installed. This report can have up to 4 photographs per item for easier item location. The label installation report will save you time and money and eliminate frustration when locating each piece of equipment.


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