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woensdag 15 maart 2017

Electrical Safety: Must Watch Video -New Downloads & OSHA Fines!

 

Electrical Safety:  Crane Truck Contact

Do You Have A Written Electrical Safety Program?
 
 
OSHA Looks At Employer of Electrician Who Died
February 8, 2017
Courtesy of Omaha World-Herald

Federal regulators have until mid-May to complete an investigation into the employer of an electrician who was injured in a fire near downtown Omaha in December and then died.

Steven Nitz, an electrician, was injured Dec. 13 at the Sprint Communications building near Seventh and Leavenworth Streets.

This week, Taylor Wilson, a spokesman for Nebraska Medicine, confirmed his death, but wouldn't provide additional information, citing privacy regulations. It's unclear when Nitz died; Wilson said he couldn't disclose that information. 

Nitz had been hospitalized at the Nebraska Medical Center since being injured Dec. 13, Wilson said.

At the time of the fire, Nitz, 59, was working as a contractor for Sprint, the phone company has said.

Officials with the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration said they opened an investigation into Nitz's employer, Electrical Testing Solutions of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, on Dec. 15, two days after the blaze.

"OSHA always investigates the employer of the victim," agency spokesman Scott Allen said. Sprint isn't being investigated in connection with the incident, he said this week, because it had hired Electrical Testing as a contractor.

A man who identified himself on the telephone Tuesday as an executive with Electrical Testing Solutions said the company is not allowed to comment on the man's death or the OSHA investigation. He wouldn't give his name.

OSHA also wouldn't comment further. The regulator doesn't provide information on pending investigations. The agency has six months, in this case until about May 15, to complete its investigation, Allen said.

An Omaha Police Department report on the December incident says Nitz, of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, had been shocked and burned when authorities found him inside a Sprint building southeast of downtown.

The blaze was a small one in the building's main electrical breaker, authorities said. When firefighters arrived, they were told by workers that an injured man was downstairs in the electrical room.

The fire caused an outage affecting landline and cellular phones in the Omaha area. Service was restored later that day.
Sprint expressed its condolences for Nitz's death earlier this week.

Fire officials have listed the fire's cause as accidental.



 

Start The New Year Compliant  -On-Site Safety Training Is What We Do



January 18, 2017 - $219K in OSHA Fines For Bay Fabrication
Two Workers Suffer Severe Injuries Within 10 Days
January 18, 2017
GREEN BAY, Wis 
 
In less than 10 days in 2016, two employees at a Green Bay muffler component manufacturer suffered severe injuries as they operated machinery without adequate safety guards and procedures in place, federal workplace safety investigators have determined.

On Jan. 18, 2017, the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued one willful, one repeated, one other-than-serious violation and two serious violations to Bay Fabrication. The company, part of the Bay Family of Companies with 75 locations in the U.S., faces $219,242 in proposed penalties.

Investigators determined a worker had his left hand crushed on July 21, 2016, by a molding machine, when the tamp head smashed his hand as he removed a mold from the machine. OSHA found the machine's safety interlock on the door guarding the operating parts was damaged and not functional properly which disabled the safety guard and led to the injury.

On July 30, 2016, another worker suffered the partial amputation of his left middle finger. In this instance, investigators found the molding machine cycled and caught his finger in an unguarded pinch point. They determined the machine was not locked out as required.

"The fact that two workers suffered debilitating injuries is tragic. The reality is that the company failed to re-evaluate its machine safety procedures and continued to expose other workers to the same hazards even after these injuries," said Robert Bonack, OSHA's area director in Appleton. "Adequate and properly installed machine safety guards and lockout/tag out procedures must be in place to prevent workers from coming in contact with operating parts."  
OSHA also found the company:
  • Failed to guard operating parts on various machines in the facility.
  • Improperly installed safety guards on machines that created a hazard for employees.
  • Failed to record work related injury on the illness and injury logs.

 

Proposed penalties:  $219,000
   
 
How To Choose Gloves To Protect Against Arc Flash
February 1, 2017
Courtesy of OH&S 
 
There are a lot of misconceptions about arc flash, starting with what it actually is. It is not a flash of light or an arc of fire. It is related to but not the same as electric shock, and there is not usually direct contact with electricity. Yet arc flash is deadly serious, and there are more than 30,000 incidents that result in 400 fatalities every year. So how can you protect your hands from this deadly killer?



Can Arc Flash Be Prevented?

Yes. Let's start by exploring what arc flash is. Arc flash is an electrical current that jumps from the desired path and travels through the air from one conductor to another. It incorporates both radiant and convective heat and can reach temperatures of up to 35,000° F. Imagine a bolt of lightning veering off course. It has the potential to ignite clothing and burn workers. Anyone in the path of the electrical discharge or in the vicinity can be severely injured or even killed.

Arc flashes can occur around high-voltage or current machinery for several different reasons, including:
  • Incorrect wire gauge
  • System overload
  • Worn-through or thinning insulation
  • Corroded contacts
  • Cleaning with flammables
  • Dropped, misplaced, or improperly used tools
  • Accidental human contact due to inappropriate gloves or other PPE
  • Improper or incomplete installation of equipment
The most obvious and best way to prevent an arc flash is to work on de-energized equipment. If there is no current flowing through a device, there will be no arc flash.  Sometimes, however, it is necessary to work on energized equipment or on equipment whose status is unknown.  In these circumstances, it is important to work with your safety specialist to find the proper hand protection for working with energized circuits. 

1. Prevent ignition by wearing gloves that will not ignite.
While arc flash injuries can be to the face, hand, or body, hands are normally first to catch fire. Therefore you don't want to wear gloves that will burn, catch fire, or not protect from heat. Beyond sustained injuries, ignoring the need for proper electrical PPE can result in huge fines.

Rubber insulating gloves are traditional for working with arc flash hazards. Rubber insulating gloves can be bulky or difficult to work in, so lighter-weight arc flash and electrical gloves are coming into the market.

When do you need to wear rubber-insulating gloves, and when can you simply wear arc flash-rated gloves without rubber-insulating gloves underneath? According to the NFPA 70E and the CSA Z472 standards, all types of work with shock exposures of greater than 50V require the use of rubber insulating gloves.

Most non-rubber arc flash gloves are either leather or coated, and they are all FR protective. The materials they are made from can be either inherently FR (like aramid, leather, wool, glass, and coated nylon) or treated (as in with Pyrovatix, Proban, or Indura).

2. Wear gloves with sufficient protection.

Protection must be adequate for the specific threat (level of exposure) presented by the equipment that you are working with. The arc rating of the machinery you are working on should be written on the electrical panel. If it isn't, check the manufacturer's specifications. To choose the best glove for a job, you need to understand Hazard Risk Category (HRC) and Arc Thermal Protective Value (ATPV).

HRC is the safety standard that shows the minimum amount of PPE protection a worker needs based upon the potential exposure to a hazard he or she might experience. HRC categories range from 0 to 4, with 4 being the highest risk.

The other important number that is critical in choosing the right PPE is Arc Thermal Protective Value (ATPV). ATPV is the incident energy level (measured in cal./cm2) that would cause a second-degree burn.

The HRC and ATPV are determined through a flash hazard analysis that studies all the electrical circuits in the device capable of being energized and determines how much energy would be released in case of an arc flash. Once you identify the potential exposure of your task, you can then find the ATPV for that task. The ATPV leads you to the appropriate HRC level. (See the chart below.) ASTM F1506 is the standard that determines the HRC of a glove. ASTM P S58 is the standard that determines ATPV.
 



FlashTrack Earns Recognition As Top Product For The Third Consecutive Year

 FlashTrack™ Arc Flash Data Collection Software


FlashTrack's™ simple, drag-n-drop interface is one of its biggest selling points. Couple that with the tool's intuitive, drop-down menus, convenient component libraries, and keyboard shortcuts, and you'll be up and running with FlashTrack in minutes!
 
FlashTrack™ is an award winning data collection software tool. FlashTrack™ was developed for the purpose of collecting the required equipment attributes that are needed to conduct an arc flash analysis. These same attributes can be used to complete a coordination study or short circuit analysis. FlashTrack™ allows the qualified data collector to model equipment relationships using a drag-n-drop interface. FlashTrack™ is used to catalog the attributes in the format of a single-line diagram. FlashTrack™ exports the completed files to an Excel file (.xls) or CSV file and produces a "Label Installation Report" containing the location of each item that requires a label to be installed. This report can have up to 4 photographs per item for easier item location. The label installation report will save you time and money and eliminate frustration when locating each piece of equipment.

 

Download FlashTrack Process Comparison - See For Yourself 
 
 

The world's best arc flash data collection software just got better.

Not only is it easy to collect your data, but now you can view it virtually anywhere on any connected device.

 Imagine the possibilities!



Facility Results has launched a new website dedicated to providing full documentation, tutorials and knowledge base for FlashTrack.   

This website is designed for the user to "meet" FlashTrack. 
To Learn More Go To
What OSHA Says About Protecting Workers From Electrical Flames and Arc Hazards

What OSHA says about protecting workers from Electrical Flames and Electrical Arc Hazards:
  • The employer must assess the workplace to identify workers exposed to flame or electric-arc-hazard.
  • No later than January 1, 2015, employers must estate the incident heat energy of electric-arc hazard to which a worker would be exposed.
  • No later than April 1, 2015, employers generally must provide workers exposed to hazards from electric-arc with protective clothing and other protective equipment with an arc rating greater than or equal to the estimated heat energy.

Facility Results has several programs that can be implemented in as little as one week for most average size facilities.  
Call us today so we can help you become compliant

 

Free Download

FlashTrack™ Arc Flash Data Collection Software



FlashTrack's™ simple, drag-n-drop interface is one of its biggest selling points. Couple that with the tool's intuitive, drop-down menus, convenient component libraries, and keyboard shortcuts, and you'll be up and running with FlashTrack in minutes!

FlashTrack™ is an award winning data collection software tool. FlashTrack™ was developed for the purpose of collecting the required equipment attributes that are needed to conduct an arc flash analysis. These same attributes can be used to complete a coordination study or short circuit analysis. FlashTrack™ allows the qualified data collector to model equipment relationships using a drag-n-drop interface. FlashTrack™ is used to catalog the attributes in the format of a single-line diagram. FlashTrack™ exports the completed files to an Excel file (.xls) or CSV file and produces a "Label Installation Report" containing the location of each item that requires a label to be installed. This report can have up to 4 photographs per item for easier item location. The label installation report will save you time and money and eliminate frustration when locating each piece of equipment.


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