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Nature Nanotechnology Contents February 2017 Volume 12 Number 2 p93-184

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

February 2017 Volume 12, Issue 2

Commentary
Research Highlights
News and Views
Correction
Review
Letters
Articles
In The Classroom
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Commentary

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Raising financing through strategic timing   pp93 - 98
Elicia Maine and V. J. Thomas
doi:10.1038/nnano.2017.1
Strategic timing can be key for nano-drug-delivery ventures to get financing. Timely publications engage potential partners; early broad, blocking, relevant patents demonstrate the potential to appropriate value; and venture formation closer to clinical viability better aligns its timeline with that of venture capitalists.

Research Highlights

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Our choice from the recent literature   p99
Alberto Moscatelli, Chiara Pastore, Giacomo Prando and Victoria Richards
doi:10.1038/nnano.2017.10

News and Views

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Raman spectroscopy: Tipping point   pp100 - 101
Guillaume Goubert and Richard P. Van Duyne
doi:10.1038/nnano.2016.266
Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy can be used to characterize the relationship between the topography and the chemical activity of individual surface sites.

See also: Letter by Zhong et al.

Wearable electronics: Stretching the limits   p101
Olga Bubnova
doi:10.1038/nnano.2017.7

Single virus force spectroscopy: The ties that bind   pp102 - 103
Christian Sieben and Andreas Herrmann
doi:10.1038/nnano.2017.5
A new technology enables high-resolution force mapping between a single virus and its target cell while simultaneously imaging live cell fluorescence.

See also: Article by Alsteens et al.

Spintronics: Electric control of skyrmions   pp103 - 104
Achim Rosch
doi:10.1038/nnano.2016.244
The creation and destruction of magnetic whirls by the application of an electric field may be the basis for novel memory technologies.

See also: Letter by Hsu et al.

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Correction

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Correction   p104
doi:10.1038/nnano.2017.8

See also: Thesis by Toumey

Review

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Utilizing the power of Cerenkov light with nanotechnology   pp106 - 117
Travis M. Shaffer, Edwin C. Pratt and Jan Grimm
doi:10.1038/nnano.2016.301
This Review summarizes the developments in Cerenkov imaging and highlights how advances in nanotechnology and materials science have opened new avenues for basic and applied sciences using Cerenkov luminescence.

Letters

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Helical edge states and fractional quantum Hall effect in a graphene electron–hole bilayer   pp118 - 122
Javier D. Sanchez-Yamagishi, Jason Y. Luo, Andrea F. Young, Benjamin M. Hunt, Kenji Watanabe, Takashi Taniguchi, Raymond C. Ashoori and Pablo Jarillo-Herrero
doi:10.1038/nnano.2016.214
Applying magnetic and electric fields to twisted bilayer graphene creates an electron–hole bilayer that features helical 1D edge modes and fractional quantum Hall states.

Electric-field-driven switching of individual magnetic skyrmions   pp123 - 126
Pin-Jui Hsu, André Kubetzka, Aurore Finco, Niklas Romming, Kirsten von Bergmann and Roland Wiesendanger
doi:10.1038/nnano.2016.234
The electric field generated by the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope can be exploited to locally and reversibly switch between a ferromagnetic state and a skyrmion.

See also: News and Views by Rosch

Nanocavity optomechanical torque magnetometry and radiofrequency susceptometry   pp127 - 131
Marcelo Wu, Nathanael L.-Y. Wu, Tayyaba Firdous, Fatemeh Fani Sani, Joseph E. Losby, Mark R. Freeman and Paul E. Barclay
doi:10.1038/nnano.2016.226
A torque magnetometer and radiofrequency susceptometer based on ultrasensitive optomechanical nanocavity readout has been demonstrated.

Probing the electronic and catalytic properties of a bimetallic surface with 3 nm resolution   pp132 - 136
Jin-Hui Zhong, Xi Jin, Lingyan Meng, Xiang Wang, Hai-Sheng Su, Zhi-Lin Yang, Christopher T. Williams and Bin Ren
doi:10.1038/nnano.2016.241
Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in conjunction with scanning tunnelling microscopy can be used to correlate chemical properties and surface topography of bimetallic catalysts with high spatial resolution.

See also: News and Views by Goubert & Van Duyne

Articles

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Gapless Andreev bound states in the quantum spin Hall insulator HgTe   pp137 - 143
Erwann Bocquillon, Russell S. Deacon, Jonas Wiedenmann, Philipp Leubner, Teunis M. Klapwijk, Christoph Brüne, Koji Ishibashi, Hartmut Buhmann and Laurens W. Molenkamp
doi:10.1038/nnano.2016.159
A Josephson junction with a weak link made of the quantum spin Hall insulator HgTe shows evidence of topological superconductivity in response to an a.c. excitation.

Valley- and spin-polarized Landau levels in monolayer WSe2   pp144 - 149
Zefang Wang, Jie Shan and Kin Fai Mak
doi:10.1038/nnano.2016.213
The fabrication of high-quality WSe2 monolayers makes it possible to access the fully valley- and spin-polarized structure of Landau levels theoretically predicted for transition metal dichalcogenides.

Vectorial scanning force microscopy using a nanowire sensor   pp150 - 155
Nicola Rossi, Floris R. Braakman, Davide Cadeddu, Denis Vasyukov, Gözde Tütüncüoglu, Anna Fontcuberta i Morral and Martino Poggio
doi:10.1038/nnano.2016.189
Individual nanowires are used to realize a new form of atomic force microscopy suitable for mapping both the size and direction of weak forces.

A universal and ultrasensitive vectorial nanomechanical sensor for imaging 2D force fields   pp156 - 162
Laure Mercier de Lépinay, Benjamin Pigeau, Benjamin Besga, Pascal Vincent, Philippe Poncharal and Olivier Arcizet
doi:10.1038/nnano.2016.193
The vectorial force fields of singly clamped nanowires are imaged by measuring the pertubation of the spectral and geometrical properties of the thermal noise of the nanowires.

Evolutionary multi-objective optimization of colour pixels based on dielectric nanoantennas   pp163 - 169
Peter R. Wiecha, Arnaud Arbouet, Christian Girard, Aurélie Lecestre, Guilhem Larrieu and Vincent Paillard
doi:10.1038/nnano.2016.224
A numerical technique that can self-adapt to experimental limitations can guide the design of photonic nanostructures by optimizing multiple parameters.

Host–guest chemistry with water-soluble gold nanoparticle supraspheres   pp170 - 176
Yizhan Wang, Offer Zeiri, Manoj Raula, Benjamin Le Ouay, Francesco Stellacci and Ira A. Weinstock
doi:10.1038/nnano.2016.233
Porous supraspheres offer the host properties of supramolecular cages while rivalling the capacities of porous solid-state materials.

Nanomechanical mapping of first binding steps of a virus to animal cells   pp177 - 183
David Alsteens, Richard Newton, Rajib Schubert, David Martinez-Martin, Martin Delguste, Botond Roska and Daniel J. Müller
doi:10.1038/nnano.2016.228
An atomic force microscope and confocal microscope set-up that allows nanomechanical mapping of virus binding under cell culture conditions shows that the first binding steps of a virus to a cell surface receptor are specific and weak, but affinity increases as more bonds are formed between the virus and cell surface receptors.

See also: News and Views by Sieben & Herrmann

In The Classroom

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Society is part of the equation   p184
Verena Schulze Greiving and Kornelia Konrad
doi:10.1038/nnano.2017.6
Verena Schulze Greiving and Kornelia Konrad describe a toolbox that they developed to support researchers in exploring the societal implications and prerequisites of their work.

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